Is your diet the main saboteur on your journey to wellness?

When your diet is your biggest saboteur. Image credit: The Telegraph

Is your diet the main saboteur on your journey to wellness?

If you took a sample of people who were dedicated to exercising regularly and asked them why they started, most would say they wanted to get “healthy.” But we know that being “healthy” isn’t a real goal. When you dig a little deeper, you learn the truth about what motivates individuals to include exercise in their lives.

I was out of shape.

I had a physical coming up.

I had a family reunion/bar mitzvah/wedding in six months.

I couldn’t fit into my jeans.

Exercise is usually the first step in a healthier lifestyle. It’s easy to add in and you feel great when you’re done. It taps into our endorphins and makes us feel a sense of accomplishment. Exercise is its own reward.

But exercise isn’t everything. It’s just an important part of the bigger picture. So when I ask you what might be standing your way, keeping you from achieving your goals, what do you think it could be? If you exercise six times a week but fail to see progress — what could be sabotaging your success?

It might be your food. In fact, it probably is your food.

Many people who have had food issues for most of their lives don’t look at food as the barrier to success. When we have a relationship with food that goes beyond fuel, it’s difficult to see it as something that stands in our way. For many of us, food represents so much. It’s non-judgemental and been a constant throughout our lives. We socialize over meals with friends and family. We treat ourselves after a particularly difficult day. And we never examine how boredom, routine, and emotions tie into how we eat, what we eat, and when we eat.

It’s funny how quickly people defend their food consumption habits.The number of times that I’ve heard “it’s not my food, I just need to exercise more” is no longer surprising. Food always gets a pass — and it’s because unpacking our relationship with food is more difficult than unpacking our relationship with exercise. But without an examination of how you use food in your life, your goals will continue to slip away.

To start, keep a diary of what you eat and when you eat (more about the importance of food tracking can be found here). Spend some thinking about your relationship with food and figure out what role it has played in your life. Moving forward, what role should it be playing? How will you make this shift? Can you do this alone, or do you need help?

If you have a trainer, take the time to talk about food. Do they have any suggestions on how you can form healthy habits? Can they recommend strategies to help re-contextualize your food relationship? Trainers aren’t just focused on how much you lift. They are your partner in progress towards your goals — so don’t be afraid to admit how food might be your main saboteur on your road to wellness. You might be surprised to learn that they have faced a similar challenge, and can offer you non-judgemental support and solutions.

Related links:

Can You Exercise Off a Bad Diet?

How Bad Diet Could Be Causing You Injury and Illness

Consent cards turn yoga studios into safe spaces

Consent cards make it easier for yoga students to indicate whether they welcome hands-on adjustment. Image credit: yogabysarah.com

Consent cards bring respect for personal space back to the yoga industry

Consent cards / Image credit: Yoga Standards Project / yastandards.comA couple of months ago, I wrote about my feelings about yoga. I was tired of the commercialization and the guru culture that permeates so many studios. While I loved how yoga made me feel and the health benefits, I had conflicting feelings about yoga culture. As yoga shifted from a physical meditation practice to a lifestyle, we compromised the intention behind the act. However, we also gained new practitioners — open to challenging themselves and attempting a new approach to wellness.

The yoga studio developed a reverence akin to a religious space and spirituality was often intertwined with exercise. As yoga studios began to spring up everywhere — just walk three blocks in any major city and see if you can’t find a yoga studio — we also became complacent to some of the more unsavoury practices going on behind those walls.   

As the #MeToo movement has grown, we’ve seen yoga studios called out as locations for sexual assaults. From those who gave their names to entire practices to specific teachers who performed handsy hands-on adjustments, yoga joined the number of industries where abuses of power were not discussed. By shifting the focus from the yoga practice itself by exalting those teaching it, the power shifts dramatically from student to teacher. That quiet spirituality we were asked to embrace became synonymous with not speaking up.

Fortunately, through exposés and public sharing, we’ve started to reclaim yoga studios as the safe spaces they were always intended to be. At a recent visit to a local Toronto studio, I was asked to take a Consent Card and place it next to my mat. One side featured the words “It’s OK to offer me hand-on adjustments during this class.” The other read “No thanks I’d prefer not to receive hands-on adjustments today.

This is how yoga students are taking their power back and silently informing instructors of boundaries and offering consent. By actively flipping the card to either side, the student is making a conscious decision whether or not they want to be adjusted. And for those of us too shy to tell an instructor they don’t want to be touched, they are ideal. For many students, their reverence for their teachers put them in vulnerable positions. Also, consider some of the trickier poses that we hold in class. I know there have been times where I’ve been in camel pose and seen an instructor walk by … and have thought to myself “just keep walking … just keep walking ….” Depending on the day, hands-on adjustments can go from being helpful to intrusive. For those of us protecting injuries, we are fearful that a simple correction may push us beyond a place of comfort.

As studios realize, like most industries, how easily power has been abused — the responsibility is theirs to protect their students. Consent Cards will not separate the teachers from the abusers, but they are a step in the right direction. We need to proudly take one at the start of a class and display it honestly. We also need to encourage all yoga studios to partake in this practice. After all, how can you focus on inner peace when you’re worried about being touched inappropriately in the guise of correction?


 

TrainingSpaces is pleased to welcome strength training specialist and Globe columnist Paul Landini. “I specialize in helping beginners become masters, in taking the complexity out of weight training so that you can walk into any gym in the world with confidence. It doesn’t matter how old you are or how inexperienced; if you’re willing to put in the work, I guarantee results.”

To book time with Paul or any of our other trainers,  just complete the contact form below.

Life partner, workout partner: building the relationship by building fitness

Laura Rantin working with a partner.

Life partner, workout partner: building the relationship by building fitness

Working out is frequently seen as a solitary pursuit. If you’re not taking a group class — aerobics, yoga, dancercise — chances are you’re following an individual program, or at least making it up as you go along. If you’re not under the guidance of a trainer, getting all sweaty and out of breath doesn’t seem like the most social thing to do.
 
But what if that’s not always the case? What if you’re comfortable or familiar enough with someone that you’re OK letting them see you as a work in progress — or vice versa? We’ve all heard the stories of gyms as singles cruising grounds, places where you’re just as likely to get hit on as you are to perfect your lifting technique, but what about established couples? What about couples who work out together?
 
There’s plenty of evidence that two partners working together can achieve cumulative results greater than the sum of their parts. Your spouse / partner / significant other can encourage you. They can spur you to better results than you could achieve on your own by holding you accountable and giving you that extra bit of motivation. Whatever the goal — losing weight, building muscle, increasing flexibility, cranking up endurance — working with a partner can help you go harder, longer, and with more dedication.
 
And there’s no shortage of fitness-related activities that couples can enjoy together. You don’t have to tie yourself to the gym. Try: 
  • going for a bike ride
  • taking a dance class 
  • hitting the tennis court
  • renting a canoe
  • rock climbing (if you’re OK with heights)

Not only are you burning calories — you’re getting in some quality time and (hopefully) building intimacy!

Doing things together can be great for relationships. As with most things, of course, a lot depends on clear communication. You want to be sure you’re sharing similar goals and similar approaches to achieving them. There’s nothing wrong with a little healthy competition, as long as you’re both on the same page. It’s important to work things out ahead of time, as much as possible, so you can avoid awkward situations or at least know how to deal with them if they arise. Will you be OK critiquing each other’s technique? What if one of you does well and the other doesn’t? Will you discover something that only one of you enjoys, and if so, will the other be supportive? 
 
As long as you and your partner approach these things with open eyes, open hearts, and open minds, there’s nothing but upside. Partners discover things they never knew they had in common. They can try things they never thought they were capable of. Better physical fitness never hurt anyone, and it can take a relationship to new heights. Now grab your partner, get out there, and get active!
 
Further reading:

Finding your trainer soulmate​

Personal trainer coaching client on stationary bike. Image credit: Universal Training Academy

Finding your trainer soulmate

So, you’ve decided to get a trainer because you’ve heard that a trainer is what you need to reach your goals. And yes! Working side-by-side with someone who “gets” you is often the first step. At TrainingSpaces, we have a roster of in-house trainers who each have unique specialties and expertise. When you contact us, we’ll try to  match you with the trainer we think will be the best fit.

But there are also some things for you to consider:

What do you want to achieve? What are your expectations from this relationship? Do you have a clear goal in mind or is it just overall well-being and improved fitness? The more specific you can be, the better it will be for us to match you with the right trainer.  

Be honest about past experience. It might be difficult to admit that you haven’t stepped into a gym since Canada Fitness was handing out participation pins. Maybe you were an all-star athlete but were sidelined by an injury — one that still plays up when you do squats. Everyone has a background in exercise experience and being upfront is essential. It’s a baseline and a reality check. Your history is what makes you unique and allows your trainer to customize the best plan to achieve your goals.

Be realistic. How many hours can you commit to training? Often we want to jump into things and commit ourselves to the process. However, promising to train like Chris Hemsworth before shooting the next Thor movie is completely unrealistic — unless you are Chris Hemsworth and Marvel is paying you to work out 24/7. On the other hand, suggesting that you want to train every two weeks to lose 20 lbs by Labour Day is equally unrealistic. Think about how much time you can really afford to train and set small goals.

Prepare to experience mental and physical achievements. Part of the beauty of working with a trainer is building a relationship with someone who really knows and understands you. Being comfortable being yourself is so important to this relationship. In the mix of repetition and physical exercise, I’ve seen clients figure out their next career move, relationships, and sort through family dynamics. Go with the process and don’t be scared if something triggers that emotional release. It’s not frightening. It’s human.

Speak up. I’m not talking about the “it’s too heavy” complaint — I’m talking about the “I can’t do this because I will damage myself” feedback. Throughout your workout, it’s our responsibility to keep you strong and safe. If you are uncomfortable, you need to let us know. If you cannot tell your trainer how you are feeling, this is the wrong person for you. There’s no shame in admitting that you just don’t click with your trainer. Let us know as soon as possible. This way we can rematch you as quickly as possible.

Finding a trainer can be a daunting experience so take your time. Your trainer soulmate is out there!


How did you find your trainer? What was/is the best thing about him/her? Let us know in the comments!