Having fitness goals is a great idea, but be smart about it

Smart fitness goals: woman running across a bridge. Image credit: SoPosted.com

Setting fitness goals is a great idea, but you want to be smart about it

For many of us, deciding to start on our health and wellness journey begins with a goal. We may find ourselves winded after climbing the stairs with groceries or receive an invitation to a 25th reunion. Something sparks inside us and says: “it’s time to get healthy” or “it’s time to lose weight.” This will be the motivation we need to take that first step. The idea has been planted in our heads and  it’s time to make positive changes.

But how do you know if you’re setting a realistic goal for yourself? What’s the difference between declaring “I want to get healthy” and “I want do 45 minutes of cardio, three times of week”?  And which approach will be more successful?

No matter if you’re setting a goal for business or fitness, success is most often achieved when goals are SMART: Specific, Measurable, Action-Oriented, Reasonable, and Timely. What does this actually mean?

Specific: “I want to get healthy” is not a specific goal. What does “healthy” mean to you? Is it reducing your bad cholesterol numbers? Maybe it means snacking less on unhealthy foods and bringing your lunch from home. Think about the one thing that you want to achieve and make it very specific and personal.

Measurable: How do you measure “healthy?” By having a number as a target, you can achieve your intentions. Quantifying your goals makes your achievement clear. Did you go to the gym four times this week? Did you perform six pull-ups? Were you able to climb three flights of stairs? Either you did it or you didn’t. There’s nothing in between.

Action-Oriented: If you want to “get healthy,” there’s no concrete set of action steps to adopt. How will you get healthy? Whether it’s writing down everything you eat in a journal or not bailing on your interval training class when you would rather crash, your actions have consequences. What actions will you take?

Reasonable: If you said your goal was to run a marathon by October and you had never participated in a 5 KM run before — I would say that your goal would be unreasonable. However, if you wanted to run a marathon in October, 2019, and you were prepared to commit to training five days a week for the next year, I would applaud your dedication and we would work on a plan. There’s nothing wrong with dreaming and imagining ourselves achieving (and even surpassing) our goals. But we all need a shot of reality.

Timely: By setting a time-frame to achieve your goal, you will be more motivated to stay on track. It gives us something to work towards and an actual framework to work within. This isn’t the mindset of “special occasion” weight loss (which we’ve previously discussed), but a logical, measurable length of time.

One of the joys of setting SMART goals is that you can fall in love with the process. It’s not about the quick fix but the longer journey. Instead of focusing on the “when,” it’s a concrete plan for “how.” By breaking down your goal into very specific parts, you can track your success.

Take a look at your goal — and then take it apart. Tweak and adjust it until it’s SMART and you can evaluate your progress every week in a clear way. Did you achieve everything you set out to do? If not, what needs to change? Minor adjustments will keep you focused and increase the probability of attaining what you are setting out to achieve.

Running 101: how to overcome your fears and hit the road

Running 101: woman in track suit at the starting line. Image via Gratisography

Running 101: how to overcome your fears and hit the road

In the warmer months, many of my clients tell me that they want to start running. But, haunted by the ghosts of gym classes past, they are fearful. But running is for everyone — unless you have knee/joint mobility issues.

But how do you get started? Here are some tips to conquer your fear of running.

Get a Walk to Run app

There are so many programs designed to help wannabe runners progress incrementally. Most of these apps slowly increase your running time and you’ll see how easy it is to go from 30 seconds of running to five minutes to 10 minutes to 30 minutes. I recommend the Run 5K – Interval Training Program (https://www.felttip.com/run5k/) app or the C25K (Couch to 5K) http://www.c25kfree.com/ which both have simple interfaces and let you listen to your own music or podcasts while you train three times a week. They are designed for first time runners.

Make a playlist

And speaking of music, there’s nothing that can terminate a workout like a terrible song. It’s enough to make you give up. If you can craft a special running playlist, timed to your workout, you can give yourself the motivation you crave when you’re running up that hill.

Run somewhere

Sometimes it’s difficult to get motivated to run in a 5K loop around the neighbourhood. But what if you are running to something or somewhere? Why not run instead of waiting for the bus? Make sure you have plenty of time to incorporate your walks and runs — following your program. By running with intent, you need to maintain a pace or you’ll be late. This is an easy way to incorporate your run time into your weekly routine.

Sign up for a race

Sure races bring out the super competitive professionals with legs longer than your entire body. But they also bring out families, first time runners, and people who really believe in a cause. There are a number of races dedicated to fundraising for specific charities and institutions. Find something that you really care about and raise some money to support their initiatives. It doesn’t matter how slow you run — knowing that you’re running for a cause is enough to keep you going.

It’s just you and the road

Runners love the meditative running high they get by taking on the road. Some days you fly down the street and hit your milestones with minutes to spare. Other days, there’s an elderly lady speed-walking and leaving you in the dust. But at the end of every day, you’ve accomplished something great. Every run is worth celebrating. Speed and distance don’t matter. The fact you did it … that’s the true accomplishment.

So… are you ready to lace up and hit the pavement? Good luck — and don’t forget to warm up and stretch to prevent injury.

Andres kicks it at the Marathon!

Andres Palomino at the Toronto Marathon May 6 2018
Andres Palomino at Toronto Marathon May 6, 2018

Andres kicks it at the Marathon!

Trainer Andres Palomino, seen here at last Sunday’s Toronto Marathon, is a registered professional kinesiologist and wellness coach. Originally from Colombia, he has been involved with sports, exercise, and physical fitness since his childhood.

With more than a decade’s experience working with clients over 50, Andres has developed a unique and comprensive insight into their health and fitness needs. Through his work with Fit After 50, he has been able to specialize in the prevention and management of recurring pain, arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes, high blood pressure, and other physical conditions or challenges affecting the over-50 age group.

Andes’ qualifications are extensive. They include:

  • Master of Science in Kinesiology from the University of Victoria in British Columbia
  • Post Graduate Diploma in Workplace Wellness and Health Promotion from Centennial College
  • Bachelor’s degree in Sports and Exercise Sciences from National School of Sports, Cali, Colombia
  • Senior’s Fitness Instructor Course, The Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging
  • Soft Tissue Release Training, 
  • Provider member of “Exercise is Medicine Canada” (EIMC) Professional Network 

and many more. Read his trainer profile here and visit his website here.

Andres Palomino at the Toronto Marathon Sunday May 6 2018