Electronic Muscle Stimulation: a high-intensity workout, but you need to be prepared

Electronic muscle stimulation provides an intense and high-energy workout. Image source: Ebenezer Samuel / Men's Health

Electronic Muscle Stimulation: a high-intensity workout, but you need to be prepared

If you love to learn about new exercise and fitness trends, The Future of Fitness explains it to you in a way you can understand and separate the hype cycle from actual results.

Electronic Muscle Stimulation (EMS) is muscle contraction using electric impulses. When you EMS train, the impulses are generated through electrodes placed near the muscles being stimulated. A number of studios have sprung up touting EMS Training as more efficient than traditional workouts. But what’s it like to be strapped into a bodysuit that makes you look like you should be fighting zombies instead of doing squats?

The first thing to know about EMS training is that your studio will provide you with the high-tech undergarments that you see on their site. These are meant to be worn without underwear (no sports bras!). They are tight. Really tight. Then, the studio trainer will spray you with water. The suit you wear will also be sprayed with water. This allows for increased conductivity. Each electrode will be adjusted to your specification, and you’ll feel a tingling sensation, a vibration, that focuses on a specific muscle group.

You’ll be led through a High Intensity Interval Training routine (6 seconds on, 4 seconds off) through a number of exercises like squats, mountain climber, side planks, and bicep curls. Working with a trainer who will adjust the pulses in the electrodes throughout the 20-minute workout, you will sweat your way through the circuit. You’ll also burn a number of calories.

The next day, you’ll feel sore but nothing unusual after a good workout. Also, depending on your shoulder strength, you might feel the pressure of the suit.

There’s no doubt that EMS training burns calories, but is it a good workout? I would recommend that if you want to try EMS, you should already be familiar with basic exercise moves and intensity. You should already know how to  perform a proper squat confidently, because the workout moves fast. While the trainers will adjust the activities, you need to be secure in your own abilities and understand your limits. Asking for alternatives to replace exercises you already know are not good for your body is essential. Like most training situations, you need to speak up and let people know when you are uncomfortable or in pain (and not a good pain).

I also wouldn’t recommend EMS to people with claustrophobia. The pressure of the suit combined with the increased intensity of the pulses may trigger feelings of being trapped. The workout moves quickly, so your heart rate will increase. Combine these factors with a new studio and a trainer you don’t necessarily know and it may make for an uncomfortable environment.

However, if you are curious — and feel physically and mentally prepared for a fast moving workout in a heavy suit — you should give EMS a try.


Have you done EMS? How was it? Awesome? Traumatic? Meh? Let us know in the comments!

Canada’s joining the trans fat ban: what does this mean for you and the way you eat?

WHO targets trans fat in policy recommendations / Image source: wotw.com

Canada's joining the trans fat ban: what does this mean for you and the way you eat?

It’s no news that trans fats are dangerous. For years we’ve been hearing how this type of fat, found in some foods, contributes to our risk of heart disease. Trans fat increases bad cholesterol (LDL) and decreases good cholesterol (HDL) — which leads to the buildup of fatty deposits.

This September, Canada joined a number of countries in banning trans fat. Denmark became the first country to eliminate trans fat from its food supply in 2004, and since then, countries across Europe have followed suit.

But what do you need to know about the trans-fat ban?

Why would anyone put trans fat in food?

Do you mean, why would anyone inject a dangerous additive that leads to heart disease and Type 2 diabetes in their bake-at-home croissants? Trans fats enhance the taste and texture of food — making it “richer.”  They also act as a preservative and allow manufacturers to extend the shelf life of products. Trans fats are also cheaper to product than animal fats.

I don’t eat trans fat … do I?

Trans fats can be found in commercially baked and fried foods made with vegetable shortening. These include fries and donuts. They’re also in hard stick margarine, shortening, and some snack and convenience foods.

But I never buy those foods!

Do you like microwave popcorn, crackers, or frozen pizza? All of these may contain trans fats. If a label mentions “partially hydrogenated oils,” it’s probably covering up for trans fats.

If there’s a ban, I don’t need to worry.

You still need to check labels and make sure your favourite foods do not contain trans fat. The Canadian government is allowing a grace period of two years for retailers to remove products from their shelves. If a product was packaged before September 15, 2018, it can still be sold. As previously mentioned, trans fat is a preservative. Even in 2020, you may still find in-date products containing this additive.

But it’s good news?

Definitely. Anything that bans trans fat is good. However, we still need to be diligent and not assume that with this legislation trans fat foods will automatically be banished from our shelves.

Want to know more about the trans-fat ban?

https://www.cbc.ca/news/health/trans-fats-health-heart-disease-canada-1.4824852

https://www.dietitians.ca/Dietitians-Views/Food-Regulation-and-Labelling/Trans-Fats.aspx

http://www.heartandstroke.ca/get-healthy/healthy-eating/the-facts-on-trans-fats

https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2018/5/14/17346108/trans-fats-food-world-health-organization-bloomberg-gates

CLF Group Training with Celia Lopez

Celia Lopez group fitness

CLF Group Training with Celia Lopez

Developed using strength and conditioning exercises, the CLF group training class features different exercises to keep you engaged, inspired, and challenged — regardless of your fitness level. Enjoy 360 body development in every one-hour session.  What can you achieve in 60 minutes? Join us for a free trial class and find out! 

This way to ketosis: what is the keto diet, and is it right for you?

The keto diet: big on protein and vegetables, low on carbs. Image source: Times Square Chronicles

This way to ketosis: what is the keto diet, and is it right for you?

If you love to learn about new exercise and fitness trends, The Future of Fitness explains it to you in a way you can understand and separate the hype cycle from actual results.

Every year or two, a new diet promises to deliver quick weight loss with minimal effort. We’ve lived through South Beach, the flat belly diet, Atkins, eating right for your blood type, all carbs, no carbs, and even the master cleanse. The new diet that everyone is committing to, talking about, and singing the praises of is the Keto diet.

What is the Keto diet? A keto diet is a very low-carb diet where the body produces small fuel molecules called “ketones.” This is an alternative fuel source that is used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. Ketones are produced in the liver from fat. On a ketogenic diet, your entire body switches its fuel supply to run almost entirely on fat. This is referred to a ketosis.

What Do I Need to Do?  The most important thing for reaching ketosis is to avoid eating too many carbs. You’ll probably need to keep carb intake under 50 grams per day of net carbs, ideally below 20 grams. The fewer carbs, the more effective. On the keto diet, you should also avoid foods containing a lot of sugar and starch. This includes starchy foods like bread, pasta, rice and potatoes.

Does it Work? There are many people who claim that the keto diet was instrumental in kick-starting their weight loss. It has also been credited as a treatment for epilepsy and other neurological disorders. Like any restrictive nutrition plan, it may be difficult to to balance keto meal requirements with real life. Additionally, the keto diet relies on caloric reduction.

Should I Try It? As with any change in diet and exercise, we always recommend that you consult with your doctor. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, the keto diet is not for you. As well, if you are taking insulin, sulphonylureas, or glinides, the keto diet should be avoided. These medications are designed to increase insulin in the body. Following a low-carb diet while on these medication can increase the risk of hypoglycemia.

More Information Please! 

Try these links and get educated about the keto diet:

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/ketogenic-diet-101

https://www.plantbasednews.org/post/no-one-should-be-doing-keto-diet-leading-cardiologist

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/keto-diet-pros-cons_us_5b3ba3b0e4b09e4a8b27ebc4

http://www.healthfitnessrevolution.com/the-5-pros-and-5-cons-of-the-ketogenic-diet/

Spinning isn’t scary: a group workout that lets you forget about what you’re wearing

Spinning class / Image credit: Duvine.com

Spinning isn't scary: a group workout that lets you forget about what you're wearing

At its very core, spinning is a cardio workout on a stationary bicycle in a group exercise environment. Despite the rise in studios with their expensive merchandise and inspirational mantras, spinning is not an elite activity that should be only attempted by those looking for a transformational experience. It can be intimidating to set foot in these highly curated environments and feel out-of-place in your worn gym clothes.

But if you are curious about trying spinning, here’s what happens once you enter the darkened world of the studio.  It’s not scary. It’s fun, challenging, and highly individualized. And you are in control of the workout the entire time.

At your first class, make sure to get the instructor’s help setting up your bike. Every studio has slightly different equipment so it’s worth checking in with the staff about proper form. If you need to clip in with special spinning shoes, don’t worry if it takes you a while to get the hang of it. Even between studios, each bike may have their own particular quirk. It helps to step into the pedal and snap down as if you were in motion. Like any piece of equipment, the more you are familiar with it, the easier it gets. Again, don’t be afraid to ask the staff for help clipping in.

Most spin studios are incorporating one session of arm exercises as part of the 50-minute class. Make sure to check the weights on your bike and adjust as necessary. The arm workout is not long but it can be challenging. Choose a weight that you think you can work with and will accommodate biceps, triceps, and shoulder reps.

During the class, the instructor may turn up the music or their microphone very loudly to encourage an atmosphere of intensity. Some studios have earplugs available so don’t be shy about grabbing a pair (or bring your own!) if you are sensitive to noise. It’s better to be comfortable than in pain — some of the instructors are loud. Really loud.

Throughout the class, you’ll be guided through each song. The instructor will suggest how much tension to add to the bike. You can adjust as necessary. Because spin is an individual exercise in a group activity, it’s ideal for people who are just starting out or recovering from an injury. You can work at your own pace or even feel free to change up the activity. Studios are usually dark, even candle-lit, so it won’t be obvious if you are unable to keep pace with the pack. Do your own workout or follow the instructor. As long as you are challenging yourself, you’ll be fine.

In other blogs, we’ve discussed exercise types that are conducive to forming cults of personality. Lead by charismatic instructors or studio owners who believe their own hype, these people can cloud the true purpose of the activity. Spin has recently become one of those places where aesthetics appears to be more important than athletics. Don’t be dissuaded. By focusing on what is happening inside the studio, and ignoring the racks of t-shirts with inspirational sayings, you will be treated to a 50-minute workout that will push you and have you returning for another session.

Life partner, workout partner: building the relationship by building fitness

Laura Rantin working with a partner.

Life partner, workout partner: building the relationship by building fitness

Working out is frequently seen as a solitary pursuit. If you’re not taking a group class — aerobics, yoga, dancercise — chances are you’re following an individual program, or at least making it up as you go along. If you’re not under the guidance of a trainer, getting all sweaty and out of breath doesn’t seem like the most social thing to do.
 
But what if that’s not always the case? What if you’re comfortable or familiar enough with someone that you’re OK letting them see you as a work in progress — or vice versa? We’ve all heard the stories of gyms as singles cruising grounds, places where you’re just as likely to get hit on as you are to perfect your lifting technique, but what about established couples? What about couples who work out together?
 
There’s plenty of evidence that two partners working together can achieve cumulative results greater than the sum of their parts. Your spouse / partner / significant other can encourage you. They can spur you to better results than you could achieve on your own by holding you accountable and giving you that extra bit of motivation. Whatever the goal — losing weight, building muscle, increasing flexibility, cranking up endurance — working with a partner can help you go harder, longer, and with more dedication.
 
And there’s no shortage of fitness-related activities that couples can enjoy together. You don’t have to tie yourself to the gym. Try: 
  • going for a bike ride
  • taking a dance class 
  • hitting the tennis court
  • renting a canoe
  • rock climbing (if you’re OK with heights)

Not only are you burning calories — you’re getting in some quality time and (hopefully) building intimacy!

Doing things together can be great for relationships. As with most things, of course, a lot depends on clear communication. You want to be sure you’re sharing similar goals and similar approaches to achieving them. There’s nothing wrong with a little healthy competition, as long as you’re both on the same page. It’s important to work things out ahead of time, as much as possible, so you can avoid awkward situations or at least know how to deal with them if they arise. Will you be OK critiquing each other’s technique? What if one of you does well and the other doesn’t? Will you discover something that only one of you enjoys, and if so, will the other be supportive? 
 
As long as you and your partner approach these things with open eyes, open hearts, and open minds, there’s nothing but upside. Partners discover things they never knew they had in common. They can try things they never thought they were capable of. Better physical fitness never hurt anyone, and it can take a relationship to new heights. Now grab your partner, get out there, and get active!
 
Further reading:

Intermittent fasting worked for Hugh Jackman. Is it the Future of Fitness?

Hugh Jackman shirtless all buff as Wolverine.

Intermittent fasting worked for Hugh Jackman. Is it the Future of Fitness?

If you love to learn about new exercise and fitness trends, The Future of Fitness explains it to you in a way you can understand and separate the hype cycle from actual results.

People are talking about Intermittent Fasting. It’s how Hugh Jackman got so pumped for Logan! It’s how you can control your appetite and eat whatever you want! It doesn’t care about carbs or fats! It’s a war on breakfast … and breakfast is the most important meal of the day!

What is Intermittent Fasting?

Intermittent Fasting is eating within a specific timed window. It’s become increasingly popular over the past few years because preliminary studies on mice and observational ones in humans suggest this method of eating might translate to weight loss and, at least in some cases, improved metabolic health. It’s also become increasingly easy with apps like Zero to undertake a fast — as they allow you to set your fast time and alert you when your fast is over.

What Do I Need to Do?

Depending on the fast type, you complete your evening meal and then fast for a designated amount of time. For some, that’s 16 hours. Others may choose the 13-hour circadian-rhythm fast where you start fasting as close to sunset as possible for at least 13 hours.

Does it work?

Yes and No. According to recent studies, nearly all types of intermittent fasting are physically and mentally harmless — and can result in some weight loss. However, there’s no evidence to show that intermittent fasting can result in more weight loss or superior health metrics compared to plain old continuous caloric restriction.

Should I Try It?

Like any new diet or exercise regimen, you always should check with your doctor before diving in. Do your research and don’t be swayed by the promises of miraculous instant weight loss. We’ve been through this before where a magical solution guarantees instant results.

More Information Please!

Try these links and learn more about the pros and cons of intermittent fasting:


Related posts:

First time at the gym

The gym: Internal studio view through fisheye lens
The gym: Internal studio view through fisheye lens

First time at the gym

The gym, studio space, or even outdoor bootcamp can be an intimidating environment. For many people starting on their road to fitness, these spaces are less than inviting.

A trendy spin studio can be dimly lit and a place where everyone knows each other — leaving you feeling like you’re experiencing high-school flashbacks. Maybe your yoga studio has so many equipment options that you don’t even know where to start. Do you need a block? A bolster? A strap? What even are these rollers?

And gym lockers. Will you remember your code or will you embarrass yourself by getting the person on the desk to unlock it for you?

Being in any new space can trigger anxiety, even from the most experienced gym-goer. But, like most things in life, the key is really to think about this gym time as your time. It doesn’t matter what everyone else is doing. If you can focus on yourself and what you need to get out of your time at the gym, it can help all these distractions fade into the background.

Prepare yourself

Asking questions, even ones you think might be stupid, is a good way to familiarize yourself with a space. The people on the desk … it’s their job to help you. Anything you can ask has probably already been asked (in a much ruder way!) many times.

Google the gym or class before you go and read reviews. Everyone likes to complain online and while these reviews shouldn’t be held as gospel, they can help prepare you for what’s to come.

Arrive early and get comfortable in the space. If you’re taking classes, the instructors will probably introduce themselves and be honest about your fitness level. They’ll appreciate it and keep your issues in mind.

The trick with any studio or gym is to think of it as a space that exists for YOU. Without you, there wouldn’t be any business. They want you to have a positive experience and most gyms want active feedback.

We all had our first days in class where we felt like outsiders. And most of us accidentally walked into the wrong change room, opened a door that turned out to be a supply closet, and yes … forgot our locker combination. Just showing up is points enough so take that first step and be brave. Soon, someone new will be looking to you and asking where the bathroom is.

Guest post: what is kinesiology?

Kinesiology image reproduced from fitafter50.com
Kinesiology image reproduced from fitafter50.com

Guest post: what is kinesiology?

Trainer Andres Palomino describes kinesiology in this post reproduced from his site.

One of the most frequent questions from people that I have had the opportunity to meet is … What is kinesiology? Who are Registered Kinesiologists?

According to the COKO, College of Kinesiologists of Ontario“Kinesiology is the scientific study of human movement, performance and function. Kinesiology incorporates the sciences of biomechanics, anatomy, physiology, psychology and neuroscience into an all-encompassing healthcare practice. Kinesiologists use the latest evidence-based research to treat and prevent injury and disease, and to improve movement and performance. Kinesiologists work with people of all ages and physical abilities in many settings to help them achieve their health and wellness goals, and improve quality of life.”

On April 1, 2013, Kinesiologists became licensed professionals in the Province of Ontario. The College of Kinesiologists of Ontario is the body responsible for the licensing of individual kinesiologists in the province.

The title kinesiologist is protected in Ontario, meaning that only members of the College can call themselves kinesiologists or claim to be kinesiologists. Members must use the titles “kinesiologist” or “registered kinesiologist”, or the designation R.Kin, when providing services.

To register with the College, an applicant must:

  • Have a four or five year kinesiology degree;
  • Complete the Jurisprudence e-Learning Module, which tests their knowledge on the laws, regulations and standards that apply to kinesiology in Ontario;
  • Submit a criminal record check to the College;
  • Pass the College’s entry-to-practice exam;
  • Provide proof of carrying professional liability insurance.

All kinesiologists who are actively practising must carry professional liability insurance.

Once registered, members have a series of obligations and responsibilities that they must fulfill to remain in good standing.   Some of these include:

  •  Acting in the patient’s / client’s best interest;
  •  Adhering to the College’s Code of Ethics;
  •  Practising according to the College’s practice standards and guidelines;
  •  Participating in the College’s Quality Assurance Program;
  •  Renewing their membership annually.

Kinesiologists prescribe exercise to treat and prevent injury and disease. Also, we work with athletes and any individuals to enhance human performance.

Kinesiologists works in the following areas:

  •  Health promotion;
  •  Injury rehabilitation;
  •  Pain and chronic disease management;
  •  Ergonomics;
  •  Fitness training;
  •  Return to work planning;
  •  Disability management;
  •  Public health.

For more information about the profession of kinesiology, please visit the web site of the College of Kinesiologists of Ontario at www.coko.ca.

For more information about how Fit After 50 can help you to be stronger and healthier, please visit www.fitafter50.ca.

Putting the studio on display

Internal view of TrainingSpaces studio, showing the abundant natural light.
Internal view of TrainingSpaces studio, showing the abundant natural light.

Putting the studio on display

The studio’s been open for a couple of weeks now, with lots of good feedback from both trainers and clients. We’ve been waiting for the right time to let everyone else see it, both here and on the gallery page we’ve been building and waiting to publish.

That time is now. After a couple of weeks of painting, drilling, hanging things on walls, and filling in holes, we’re finally at the point where we can  showcase the studio’s visual appeal. We spent some time there this afternoon doing a shoot (thank you, lord, for fisheye lenses) that we think highlights both the modern, state-of-the-art equipment and the open, airy feeling that the space enjoys thanks to the abundant natural light.

 

And there’s also the private back room where clients can take advantage of massage therapy and acupuncture. 

This is just a sample. For a more comprehensive display, please visit our gallery page.

Want to know more? Do you need motivation? Are you looking for a new approach to personal fitness? Are you looking for a private and comfortable space to work with your clients? We’re just a click away. Just fill out the contact form and we’ll be in touch. 

Watch this space and our Facebook page for more video.